reaching

Want to improve your run? Read on for 3 simple steps you can implement now!

1.     Hydrate. You’ve heard this time and again but that’s because it is true! Making sure you are hydrated before a run can improve your run. Dehydration can cause fatigue and muscle cramping, which are the last two things you want to feel when heading out for your daily run. So increase your water intake, even by 1 glass a day. You will feel better and your body will thank you for it!

2.     Rotate. This might be new to some, but the mechanics of how we run (and walk for that matter) include trunk rotation. If your upper back is tight and lacking that motion, this can lead to injury and insufficient oxygen intake. Our bodies need this motion not only to move properly and prevent injury, but for adequate oxygenation which fuels our cells affecting our muscles and giving us energy.  

Try this: Throughout the day, when seated in a chair, place your right hand on the outside of your left leg and rotate your body to the left using your arms to assist you. Once at the end of your motion (remember you should not feel any pain), take 3 deep breaths focusing on letting the air fill up the right side of your lungs; repeat to the opposite side. Do not hinge at your low back. Increasing this motion will improve your running and help prevent back pain.

3.     Increase your cadence. Research has shown that if you are having leg pain (i.e. knee pain, the dreaded IT Band pain, ankle pain), increasing your cadence by shortening your step length may be beneficial. A shorter step length can result in less force on your joints, which can help treat or prevent injury as well as increasing your efficiency!

If you find you are having any difficulty with your runs and you've tried the above suggestions, it may be time to seek out the care of a professional. Remember it's always easier to address an issue earlier than later.

Questions? Feel free to contact me at: Brandis@bakertobaypt.com. I'm always happy to help.

I hope you enjoy your runs in this beautiful weather! Until next time!

Brandis

 

"No Pain, No Gain"…. Right?

Have you ever heard the phrase “No Pain No Gain”? I’ve worked with thousands of patients over the years and have heard many comment to me “You know what they say, no pain no gain… right?” The truth is I cringe every time I hear this comment as it actually only applies in very specific circumstances.

I often tell people if it “hurts so good”, or is uncomfortable but tolerable and you’re not holding your breath, then what you are doing is most likely safe to proceed with. But, in my experience, if someone is holding their breath and counting the seconds until the exercise, stretch, or motion is over, then it is too intense! Holding our breath because something hurts can lead to tensing of muscles you want to relax or not use during an exercise, injury and other situations including passing out!

So the next time you are working out, doing something physical or working with a trainer, physical therapist, etc., remember that many times “No Pain, No Gain” can actually lead to “More Pain, Less Gain”. Listen to your body. If you are unsure if you should be feeling what you are feeling, ask the person you are working with or seek out a consultation to learn more about if what you are doing is safe and how to be effective, efficient and successful in your exercise routine! 

Have a wonderful weekend!

Brandis

Exciting Announcement!

Baker To Bay is excited to announce that services will now be offered at Joy of Pilates, 2130 Grant Street in Bellingham! Services will continue to be offered at your location of choice and I look forward to serving you, be it in your home or a relaxing treatment environment. Call or email today to schedule your visit!

Have a wonderful day!

Brandis

How does my breathing affect my shoulder?!​

Did you know one of the top 5 most common injuries for people with active, outdoor lifestyles is to the shoulder? Have you ever wondered how to build stability while maintaining mobility in your shoulder to prevent or treat injury?  Keep reading for not so common answers to very common questions!

Everyday we move our shoulders repeatedly in multiple directions. Movement occurs not only at your shoulder itself, but also at many joints throughout the shoulder complex as well as into your rib cage and spine. A person's shoulder is built for mobility based on the orientation of your true shoulder joint, so it is important to make sure that you build strength in your rotator cuff muscles. These are the primary muscles that support your shoulder, in addition to the surrounding tissues that also attach in and around that area.

 Although the shoulder has a significant amount of movement, any restriction throughout the shoulder joints can lead to injury of the muscles or jointThere is also an important piece of the puzzle that often gets missed. If your rib cage and spine are tight, then this can directly affect your shoulder mobility which in turn affects your ability to build strength. 

Our bodies are meant to function in an optimal position with good posture and alignment. Every time you move your arm overhead, you naturally should have trunk movement. If the tissues that surround your rib cage or the rib cage itself is tight, then that restriction can lead to problems elsewhere including your shoulder.

If you have limited shoulder motion in any direction, the first place to look is at how you're breathing. Are you breathing with your neck muscles or are you able to take slow deep breaths, which result in expansion and collapsing of your rib cage? Breathing with your neck muscles can lead to tightness and pain not only in your neck, but also down into your shoulder. The action of taking slow, deep breaths and feeling your lower rib cage collapse and expand allows for good rib cage mobility and prevention of tightness. Can you blow up a balloon? The only way you can blow up a balloon is to use your diaphragm! The use of your diaphragm, which attaches at the lower part of your rib cage is what keeps your trunk mobile, contributing to optimal movement in your shoulder. Once you have this, performing exercises that stabilize your shoulder complex will result in better outcomes and optimal strength!

Have a great day and take a moment to breath deeply. Your body will thank you for it!

Brandis Gunderson, MPT